When pick sloes for sloe gin?

For the best flavour, wait until the berries are ripe. They should be a rich dark purple and should squash easily between your fingertips. It’s a good sign if they’ve already started to drop naturally to the ground. If you’re picking them for sloe gin then traditionally you wait until after the first frost.

What Berry is used for sloe gin?

Sloe gin is a British red liqueur made with gin and sloes. Sloes are the fruit (drupe) of Prunus spinosa, a relative of the plum. Sloe gin has an alcohol content between 15 and 30 percent by volume.

Are sloes ripe now?

When should sloes be picked? Sloes should be picked when ripe and rich dark blue-purple in colour, and can be squashed. Some may have already fallen to the ground naturally. Traditionally sloes shouldn’t be picked until after the first frost, as it’s thought the frost splits the skin.

Can you leave the sloes in sloe gin?

Now the gin is ready to drink – but is best left to mature for a bit longer (a couple of months) – it will now keep indefinitely. Don’t throw the sloes away after you’ve drained them – they are now deliciously sweet and can be covered in chocolate and eaten with ice-cream, or as a post-supper treat.

What’s the best mixer for sloe gin?

Sloe gin is deliciously sweet with rich notes of plum and red berries. Combining this fruity sweetness with the bitter notes found in Fever-Tree Lemon Tonic Water makes for a perfectly balanced and refreshing long drink.

Is sloe gin poisonous?

Sloes are not edible raw, they are mouth-puckeringly astringent, but they are delicious as a fruity flavouring for gin (or brandy or vodka?) and sloe gin is very simple to make. You will need: a needle. some bottles with screw caps.

Is it too early to pick sloes?

For the best flavour, wait until the berries are ripe. They should be a rich dark purple and should squash easily between your fingertips. It’s a good sign if they’ve already started to drop naturally to the ground. If you’re picking them for sloe gin then traditionally you wait until after the first frost.

Do I need to defrost sloes before making sloe gin?

Thawing the sloes under spirit prevents them discolouring. Put in enough sloes to just under half-fill the jar. … At first shake the jar every few days until the sugar has dissolved then gently every week thereafter. The gin will quite quickly go pink and then go dark purple in the next few weeks.

Can you eat sloe gin berries?

Happily, leftover berries from sloe gin can also be used to re-macerate in other spirits. Brandy is a fine and Christmassy choice: leave yours to steep with 500g of leftover sloe gin berries, red wine, and a wee bit of sugar. In a month or two, you’ll have another burgundy-hued treat to toast with this winter.

Does sloe gin get better with age?

Sloe Gin improves with age (to a certain point), so make more than you need and keep some for next year.

Does sloe gin get more alcoholic?

The sweetness and flavouring can be adjusted at the end of the process depending on the makers taste. Given sufficient amounts of time to steep, the alcohol will infuse an almond like essence from the sloes stones. Sloe Gin tends to have a lower alcohol content than traditional gin of 15 and 30 percent by volume.

Why is sloe gin less alcoholic?

Despite the name, sloe gin isn’t actually a gin, but a liqueur. This is because the ABV is between 20-25%, below the minimum requirement of a spirit. “Plus there’s a lot more sugar in it than a regular gin,” Sam adds.

Should sloe gin be refrigerated?

Store it in a cool, dark cupboard or shelf out of direct sunlight if you can’t keep it in the fridge or freezer, and it should be fine. More importantly, though, gin should never be served at room temperature!

Does sloe gin need to be refrigerated?

The rule I use is: If it’s under 15% alcohol or if the base is wine, it goes in the fridge once it’s open. Spirits like whiskey, rum, gin, vodka, etc. don’t need to be refrigerated because the high alcohol content preserves their integrity.

How do you enjoy sloe gin?

Sloe gin is traditionally sipped neat or as a hot toddy cocktail according to Joanne, but it works lovely chilled too. ‘I would suggest using ice if drinking in cold cocktails such as a sloe gin and ginger ale,’ Joanne recommends. ‘Or just add a shot to a chilled glass of Prosecco.

Does sloe gin need sugar?

Sugar should really only be added at the start to produce sweet sloes for baking or chocolates, rather than good sloe gin. One of the common complaints about standard sloe recipes is that some years they produce a too-sweet liqueur, while other years are not sweet enough.